Facebook asks users to upload nudes to fight revenge porn

Facebook asks users to upload nudes to fight revenge porn

Facebook asks users to upload nudes to fight revenge porn

Grant said Facebook is not storing the image, just the hash.

If users are anxious their images will end up plastered all over Instagram or Facebook, the e-Safety commissioner will tell them to send the images to themselves on Facebook Messenger.

Julie Inman Grant, Australia's e-Safety commissioner, said Facebook would not permanently store the images, only their digital fingerprints, which are capable of blocking further attempts to upload the pictures but can not be decoded to produce the images themselves.

"We are delighted that Facebook is helping solve this problem-one faced not only by victims of actual revenge porn but also individuals with worries of imminently becoming victims", Carrie Goldberg, a New York-based sexual privacy lawyer, told the Guardian.

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However, over the last three years, there has been a sea change in the response of governments, both at central and state level. Emphasising on the importance of technology, he said the use of technology should maximise governance.

The limited pilot program is available in three other countries: the US, UK, and Canada.

The move follows on from Facebook's update earlier in the year which allowed users to report images that they thought were revenge porn.

It's not the case that every Facebook user would have to upload their nudes. One Marine in the Facebook group suggested under a photo of a women that the person who took the picture should "take her out back and pound her out", according to a report from the Center for Investigative Journalism. For protection against "revenge porn", the Telegraph reported.

The company is trialling the technology in Australia in partnership with the office of government.

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It's unclear whether Facebook is planning on bringing the technology to WhatsApp once it's capable of running autonomously, but if it really wants to make revenge porn a thing of the past, it will most definitely need to. Facebook will then prevent that particular photo from being shared. "Let's say someone created a fake Facebook account using my name, and they put my naked photographs up there". Facebook said it plans to use the images to build a database of specific photos it can then block from being uploaded to the site in future.

"Yes, they're not storing a copy, but the image is still being transmitted and processed".

It is believed that a full four percent of U.S. internet users are victims of revenge porn. If the same photo is uploaded then it will thwart the same and prevent it from distribution.

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